The King, the dream and the Chicken cage serves as a portrait of Moroccan-Jewish identity in southern Israel today, nestled in the development towns of the periphery. An identity still zealously guarded, flaunted with pride but subject to the cultural hierarchy anchored into the Israeli environment, which has undoubtedly moulded and transformed Moroccan identity within a generation. Soon-to-be-brides sit patiently as the last link to Morocco, a grandmother or mother, presses henna into her psalms to signal her transition to married life. Men in Chinese made Fez hats sipping Coca-Cola in a community hall, code switching between Moroccan Arabic, Hebrew and French. Signs of an identity refusing to give way to a wider Western–Israeli identity, but one that is ultimately waning with each generation that knows only the Eurocentric education system in which he or she was raised, and that system’s definition of what it means to be Moroccan.        A kid plays by some of the earliest houses in Yeruham, a Moroccan majority development town in the Israeli periphery, long associated with negative portrayals of the Mizrahi periphery.  2015.
       
     
 Yeruham residents celebrate the completion of a new Torah scroll, 2015.   
       
     
 A Mock-Moorish villa under construction along the main artery into Yeruḥam, a Mizraḥi majority development town of which 40% are of Moroccan descent. 2015.
       
     
 Rivka, one of the first residents of Yeruham, retells how they were boarded on buses upon arriving in Haifa and unceremoniously dumped in the empty desert at the dead of night. A strategy used by officials to ensure the creation of Jewish settlement in areas of strategic and ideological interest.  Yeruham, 2015.
       
     
 Yeruḥam. 2015.
       
     
 Three generations mapping Morocco and Israel.     Tel Aviv. 2015.
       
     
 Shimon models a Tarboush (or Fez hat) he has been making at home.  Yeruham, 2015.
       
     
 Yeruham residents celebrate the completion of a new Torah scroll.  Yeruham, 2015.
       
     
 A Moroccan pre-wedding henna ceremony.  East Jerusalem, 2014.   
       
     
 Girls dressed up at a Moroccan henna ceremony.  East Jerusalem, 2014.
       
     
 A table laid out for Mimouna, a festival unique to North African Jewry. Mimouna celebrates the end of Passover and the start of Spring, long heralded as a festival of co-existence, in which North African Jews would traditionally open up their homes to their Muslim neighbours to come and partake in the festivities.  Yeruham, 2015.
       
     
 A model waits to have her pictures taken for a henna planner's catalogue.   Ramla. 2015.
       
     
 Family members gather outside the annual death memorial of my Grandmother.  Beit Shemesh. 2014.
       
     
 A table set for the Mimouna.  Yeruham, 2015.
       
     
 Beit Shemesh. 2014.
       
     
 Yeruham 2015.   
       
     
  The King, the dream and the Chicken cage serves as a portrait of Moroccan-Jewish identity in southern Israel today, nestled in the development towns of the periphery. An identity still zealously guarded, flaunted with pride but subject to the cultural hierarchy anchored into the Israeli environment, which has undoubtedly moulded and transformed Moroccan identity within a generation. Soon-to-be-brides sit patiently as the last link to Morocco, a grandmother or mother, presses henna into her psalms to signal her transition to married life. Men in Chinese made Fez hats sipping Coca-Cola in a community hall, code switching between Moroccan Arabic, Hebrew and French. Signs of an identity refusing to give way to a wider Western–Israeli identity, but one that is ultimately waning with each generation that knows only the Eurocentric education system in which he or she was raised, and that system’s definition of what it means to be Moroccan.        A kid plays by some of the earliest houses in Yeruham, a Moroccan majority development town in the Israeli periphery, long associated with negative portrayals of the Mizrahi periphery.  2015.
       
     

The King, the dream and the Chicken cage serves as a portrait of Moroccan-Jewish identity in southern Israel today, nestled in the development towns of the periphery. An identity still zealously guarded, flaunted with pride but subject to the cultural hierarchy anchored into the Israeli environment, which has undoubtedly moulded and transformed Moroccan identity within a generation. Soon-to-be-brides sit patiently as the last link to Morocco, a grandmother or mother, presses henna into her psalms to signal her transition to married life. Men in Chinese made Fez hats sipping Coca-Cola in a community hall, code switching between Moroccan Arabic, Hebrew and French. Signs of an identity refusing to give way to a wider Western–Israeli identity, but one that is ultimately waning with each generation that knows only the Eurocentric education system in which he or she was raised, and that system’s definition of what it means to be Moroccan.

 

A kid plays by some of the earliest houses in Yeruham, a Moroccan majority development town in the Israeli periphery, long associated with negative portrayals of the Mizrahi periphery.

2015.

 Yeruham residents celebrate the completion of a new Torah scroll, 2015.   
       
     

Yeruham residents celebrate the completion of a new Torah scroll, 2015.

 

 A Mock-Moorish villa under construction along the main artery into Yeruḥam, a Mizraḥi majority development town of which 40% are of Moroccan descent. 2015.
       
     

A Mock-Moorish villa under construction along the main artery into Yeruḥam, a Mizraḥi majority development town of which 40% are of Moroccan descent. 2015.

 Rivka, one of the first residents of Yeruham, retells how they were boarded on buses upon arriving in Haifa and unceremoniously dumped in the empty desert at the dead of night. A strategy used by officials to ensure the creation of Jewish settlement in areas of strategic and ideological interest.  Yeruham, 2015.
       
     

Rivka, one of the first residents of Yeruham, retells how they were boarded on buses upon arriving in Haifa and unceremoniously dumped in the empty desert at the dead of night. A strategy used by officials to ensure the creation of Jewish settlement in areas of strategic and ideological interest.

Yeruham, 2015.

 Yeruḥam. 2015.
       
     

Yeruḥam. 2015.

 Three generations mapping Morocco and Israel.     Tel Aviv. 2015.
       
     

Three generations mapping Morocco and Israel.

 

Tel Aviv. 2015.

 Shimon models a Tarboush (or Fez hat) he has been making at home.  Yeruham, 2015.
       
     

Shimon models a Tarboush (or Fez hat) he has been making at home.

Yeruham, 2015.

 Yeruham residents celebrate the completion of a new Torah scroll.  Yeruham, 2015.
       
     

Yeruham residents celebrate the completion of a new Torah scroll.

Yeruham, 2015.

 A Moroccan pre-wedding henna ceremony.  East Jerusalem, 2014.   
       
     

A Moroccan pre-wedding henna ceremony.

East Jerusalem, 2014.

 

 Girls dressed up at a Moroccan henna ceremony.  East Jerusalem, 2014.
       
     

Girls dressed up at a Moroccan henna ceremony.

East Jerusalem, 2014.

 A table laid out for Mimouna, a festival unique to North African Jewry. Mimouna celebrates the end of Passover and the start of Spring, long heralded as a festival of co-existence, in which North African Jews would traditionally open up their homes to their Muslim neighbours to come and partake in the festivities.  Yeruham, 2015.
       
     

A table laid out for Mimouna, a festival unique to North African Jewry. Mimouna celebrates the end of Passover and the start of Spring, long heralded as a festival of co-existence, in which North African Jews would traditionally open up their homes to their Muslim neighbours to come and partake in the festivities.

Yeruham, 2015.

 A model waits to have her pictures taken for a henna planner's catalogue.   Ramla. 2015.
       
     

A model waits to have her pictures taken for a henna planner's catalogue. 

Ramla. 2015.

 Family members gather outside the annual death memorial of my Grandmother.  Beit Shemesh. 2014.
       
     

Family members gather outside the annual death memorial of my Grandmother.

Beit Shemesh. 2014.

 A table set for the Mimouna.  Yeruham, 2015.
       
     

A table set for the Mimouna.

Yeruham, 2015.

 Beit Shemesh. 2014.
       
     

Beit Shemesh. 2014.

 Yeruham 2015.   
       
     

Yeruham 2015.